PUT A CAP ON OZONE 2015

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A Way To Help Us All Breathe Easier

  

 

The Problem

Ozone pollution occurs primarily in the hot summer months when emissions from a variety of sources, including industry, automobiles and smaller, gas-powered engines, chemically react in the presence of sunshine to form a harmful ground-level pollutant.  Not to be confused with upper atmosphere ozone which provides protection from ultra-violet rays, ground-level ozone is harmful to the health of all humans, particularly the elderly, the very young and those with respiratory disease.

In recent summers, the Denver metropolitan and North Front Range areas have exceeded federal ozone limits, and in 2007 were designated as “nonattainment” for 8-hour federal ground-level ozone standards. The nonattainment area includes the counties of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Broomfield, Denver, Douglas, Jefferson, and portions of Larimer and Weld.

One Solution

Because ground-level ozone pollution is generated by so many different sources, there is no single solution to its prevention. However, it has been determined that one, relatively simple action has an immediate and significant impact.  Studies show that the reduction of emissions from faulty or missing automobile gas caps can bring about a meaningful reduction in the region’s ozone readings especially during the hot summer months.  The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, the Regional Air Quality Council, Envirotest Systems, the American Lung Association of Colorado and NAPA Auto Parts have joined together implement a program – Put a Cap on Ozone – that replaces faulty gas caps with new gas caps during the height of the summer months essentially for FREE.

 

What is Put a Cap on Ozone?

Put a Cap on Ozone is a public/private partnership providing motorists whose vehicles fail the gas cap portion of the emissions test with coupons to replace the faulty or missing caps between June and the end of August 2015.


Who is eligible to participate?

Any motorist whose vehicle fails the gas cap portion of the vehicle emissions test at an Air Care Colorado emissions inspection station, between July 1 and August 31, 2013, will receive a coupon good for $10 toward the purchase of a new gas cap at participating area NAPA Auto Parts stores.  The counties in the program area include Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Broomfield, Denver, Douglas, Jefferson, Larimer and parts of Weld.

 
What is ground-level ozone?

Ozone pollution occurs primarily in the hot summer months when emissions from a variety of sources, including industry, automobiles and smaller, gas-powered engines, chemically react in the presence of sunshine to form a harmful ground-level pollutant.  Not to be confused with upper atmosphere ozone which provides protection from ultra-violet rays, ground-level ozone is harmful to the health of all humans, particularly the elderly, the very young and those with respiratory disease.

 
Why is replacing a missing or faulty gas cap important?

Studies show that the reduction of emissions from faulty or missing automobile gas caps can bring about immediate and meaningful reductions in the region’s ozone readings especially during the hot summer months.


How much money and pollution can be saved?

In a typical month, more than 2,500 vehicles fail the gas cap portion of the vehicle emissions inspection process at Air Care Colorado stations. This summer the Put a Cap on Ozone program aims to replace up to 5,000 gas caps between July 1 and August 31, which could amount to savings of up to:

 

  • 1.25 tons per day of volatile organic compounds (VOC) – a type of pollution that can lead to ground-level ozone formation

  • 22,000 gallons of gasoline lost due to evaporation during hot summer months

  • $57,000.00 the cost of 26,000 gallons of evaporated gasoline

 
Where can I get more information about ground-level ozone?

Call the Regional Air Quality Council at 303-629-5450, or visit www.ozoneaware.org.

 
Who is providing the funding for the program?

The program is being funded by the Air Care Colorado, Envirotest Systems, NAPA Auto Parts and the Regional Air Quality Council, with additional support provided by the American Lung Association of Colorado.


What if my car has an unusual gas cap or a locking gas cap?

If you have an unusual cap, a locking cap or a tethered cap, you will simply need to pay the amount greater than $10. After installing your new cap, you must return to the emissions station for a retest.


I’m not scheduled for an emissions test until after this program is over. Can I get an early emissions test and a chance at a free gas cap?

You may obtain your emissions inspection at any time. However, keep in mind that if you choose to get your inspection early, your inspection and vehicle registration cycles will be different.


What if I failed an emissions test for some other reason just before the gas cap program starts, and then I come back for a retest and fail for the gas cap?

You can participate in the program. If you do not receive a coupon, please call the Air Care Colorado hotline at 303-456-7090.


Why do I have to take the full emissions test over again if I’ve failed only for the gas cap?

The state requires a complete retest because a vehicle may perform differently once a properly sealed cap is in place. This is particularly true for computer-controlled vehicles.

The Put a Cap on Ozone Program

  • Between June and August 31, 2015 any driver of a vehicle that fails the Colorado emissions inspection due to a faulty or missing gas cap will be provided with a voucher good for the purchase of a new gas cap – the average cost of a new cap is $10 – at NAPA Auto Parts stores in the Denver metro and North Front Range areas.

  • Following the free gas cap replacement, all vehicles will be required to repeat the emission inspection procedure. The retest is free of charge if completed within 10 calendar days.

    Put a Cap on Ozone will help to reduce ground-level ozone pollution and contribute to efforts to bring the area back into compliance.


For more information on solving the ozone problem, call the Regional Air Quality Council at 303-629-5450, or visit www.raqc.org
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